Resiliency is the ability to recover from injury. As discussed in a previous article, Ground Force Method (GFM) can be used to rehabilitate and restore pain free movement. Good body awareness and movement literacy, learned through the practice of Ground Force Method, can also prevent future injury or the re-occurrence of old injuries. Strength and mobility working hand in hand = a resilient body.

Ground Force Method is all bodyweight exercises (with the exception of some partner work), so is it possible to get stronger using Ground Force Method training? The answer to this is most definitely yes, and it can also make other training that you may do in addition, safer and more effective.

Strength comes from the body’s ability to recruit muscle fibres to work together, to perform a movement or shift load. Muscles are made up of lots of fibres and these fibres need to be switched on to contract, in order to provide strength required to move or lift. It is not possible to fire up 100% of the fibres in any given muscle because the CNS regulates this capacity and acts as a limiter to protect our joints and bones. When a muscle is injured or a joint is not mobile enough, then the CNS regulates strength further, because contraction of the muscle will exacerbate the injury or immobility. The CNS will allow more muscle fibres to fire when it is reassured that it is safe to do so. GFM reassures the CNS by utilising high quality, safe and pain free movement. Through using GFM in training, it is therefore possible to access more innate strength.

Flexibility is only safe where there is strength within the full range of motion and any movement is only as strong as it’s weakest point. Lets take the classic squat as an example; if you lack ankle mobility then you may struggle to squat to parallel and if you do manage to squat to this depth without your heels lifting off the ground, then your knees, hips and lower back will be compensating for your poor ankle mobility, putting you at risk of injury when you try to load weight into that squat. Ground Force Method teaches you about limitations in range of motion and awareness of how movement is connected through the body. GFM uses low threat movement coupled with proper posture and breathing to grow a larger range of motion so that you can become stronger. Once you have achieved a better range of ankle motion your squat will be stronger right up the chain, from the ground up!

Related GFM Blogs:
GFM Article 1: What is Ground Force Method?

GFM Article 3: Ground Force Method – Promotes Fat Loss and Fitness
GFM Article 4: Ground Force Method – Improves Longevity and Durability
GFM Article 5: Ground Force Method – Enhances Agility and Grace

This excellent article was written by Debbi Biggs, one for the Movements, Strength & Rehab Coaches at Box33